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S5:E11 D.L. Moody

S5:E11 D.L. Moody

Biography of D.L. Moody

DL Moody. The name may be familiar. There is a Moody Publishers, a Moody Bible Institute, Moody Radio. His name is all over evangelicalism. His remarkable life story is something worth noting. Though Moody was not a fundamentalist, some of the tactics he used to build his ministry would be employed by some of his lieutenants when they built the foundation of the movement.

So we’re going to spend this episode talking about this remarkable man. Born in poverty, educated to only about a 4th-grade level, he would rise to become one of the most important American evangelists. His folksy style and booming voice were winsome to the millions of people to whom he preached. In this difficult series about controversial ideas, why not take some time to discuss something that went right in the late 1800s? The ministry of Moody.

I’m joined in this episode by Kevin Belmonte. He’s the author of several history books including D.L. Moody: A Life. Check out his books and let me know what you think!

Helpful Links and Sources

Discussion Questions

  • Have you ever shared the gospel with someone like Mr. Kimball did in the shoe store? Why or why not?
  • Is there someone you could pray for that they would be saved?
  • Why do you think Moody was so popular in his day?
  • Have you ever encountered Moody Radio, Publishers, or Bible Institute?
  • The “Christian bubble” really started to take shape in the era of Moody. How has the “bubble” impacted your life?
  • What are your views on poverty? How do people become poor and how can it be fixed? Do you think that all poor people are lazy? Why?
S5:E5 The Liberals

S5:E5 The Liberals

The Birth of Liberal Modernist Theology

George Marsden characterized Christian fundamentalism as “militantly anti-modernist protestant evangelicalism”. Right there you see that fundamentalism is a reaction against something. And that something is modernist theology. Modernism is a broad term used to describe a few different schools of liberal theology. In this episode, we discuss the Tubingen and Berlin schools.

Modernist theology is often marked by the desire to discuss the “historic Jesus”. This term can be a bit confusing because it is less about understanding what historic texts say about Jesus and more about discussing the non-miraculous aspects of Jesus’ life and ministry.

Our special guest this episode is Chris Evans, professor of Christian History and Methodist Studies at Boston University and author of “Do Everything” a biography of Francis Willard.

Discussion Questions:

  • What does it mean that fundamentalism is a reaction to modernist theology?
  • What is modernist theology?
  • Do you know any theologically liberal people?
  • Do you find it difficult to both love the Lord and love your neighbor?
  • What makes someone a Christian? Does your view include theologically conservative people? What about theologically liberal people? Where is the line for you?
  • How vital are Jesus’ miracles to your life and faith?
  • Is there a tension in Christianity where it is culturally difficult to be theologically conservative and still want to love our neighbors?

Helpful Links and Sources:

S4:E7 100th Episode!

S4:E7 100th Episode!

Melvin Benson of the Cinematic Doctrine podcast asks Chris Staron about the Truce Podcast

Truce usually uses research, music, sound effects, and expert interviews to tell complicated stories about the Christian Church. We’ve made something like 100 episodes! Our listeners recommended that we celebrate by asking Chris questions submitted by audience members.

Special thanks to Melvin Benson of the Cinematic Doctrine podcast for asking the questions!

S3:E42 Take Away 1: Think Deeper About the Past

S3:E42 Take Away 1: Think Deeper About the Past

It’s time for American Christians to rethink the past. Can nostalgia for part of the past impact our witness?

MAGA folks look back on the history of the United States and see a golden era: the 1950s. When religion was in the public eye, television and movies were clean, and father came home from work with dinner hot on the table. The trouble is that this vision of the 1950s only existed in our imaginations or if we chose to ignore the world around us. The 1950s were an era of great upheaval, with public monuments to religion being erected at the same time as heavy censorship, McCarthyism, wars, racism, and sexism.

For the next few weeks we’ll be revisiting themes from season three of Truce to pull out some important takeaway. Takeaway 1: Think Deeper About the Past.

Helpful links:

Discussion Questions:

  • What do you think of when you think of the 1950s?
  • When is it okay to remember just part of history, and when do we need to consider the whole picture?
  • What era do people who wear MAGA hats want to return to? In other words, when was America greater than it is now?
  • When you think of your own childhood, what comes to mind?
    • Do world or social issues play into that?
    • How is nostalgia a helpful tool?
    • How can nostalgia shape our memory of the past?
    • Is there an era you wish to return to?
  • What can we do to create a fuller picture of the past when we retell it?
S3:E6 A Russian Christmas

S3:E6 A Russian Christmas

Christmas and New Years can be a stressful time for us. But what if you had to celebrate two Christmas’ and two Years’? Our special guest Jennifer Eremeeva (author of Have Personality Disorder Will Rule Russia) is an American married to a Russian. Each year they have the potential of four holidays in less than a month. But why?

The confusion has to do with a discrepancy in calendars. It turns out that the old Julian calendar, which is used by the Russian Orthodox Church, is several days different than the Gregorian calendar that we use. This has to do with an old disagreement between the Catholic and Orthodox churches.

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Donate here to keep Truce going!

Herring Under Fur Coat Recipe:

This recipe is pretty simple, but it may take a few hours to make so do this one in advance.

Ingredients:

  • 1 jar of mayonnaise (squeeze-able is easiest)
  • 3 medium size beats (peeled)
  • 4-5 carrots (peeled)
  • 1 large potato (peeled)
  • 1 jar of pickled herring
  • 1 bag of grated cheddar cheese
  • 1 bunch of fresh green onions
  • 1 jar of pickles

Cooking Instructions:

  1. Peel the beats, carrots, and potato then put them on boil for an hour. Yes, it will look like blood and the beats will dye the other veggies.
  2. While the vegetables are boiling, open the pickled herring (if in a jar). Remove any bones. Dice. Keep refrigerated until it is used.
  3. After the vegetables are boiled, grate each of them separately with the small holes.
  4. On a pie plate make a mound with the potato. Spread it out to the edges of your plate.
  5. Cover the potato with the following layers: mayo, pickled herring, green onions, mayo, carrots, mayo, pickles, beats, mayo, grated cheese.
  6. Place the whole thing in the refrigerator and let it sit for 2-3 hours before consuming. Overnight is okay too. The whole thing will turn a light pink color.
  7. Serve it like any other dip with veggies, crackers, or tortilla chips.

Other Sources

  • Russian Christmas blog post – Dividing My Time
  • Jennifer Eremeeva blog post – Is This Christmas?
  • Britannica article on the Julian Calendar

Topics Discussed:

  • Why is the Orthodox church on a different calendar?
  • What are the differences between the Julian calendar and the Gregorian calendar?
  • What is Christmas like in Russia?
  • What unique dish should I make for Christmas?
  • Russian food
  • Why did Pope Gregory establish the Gregorian calendar?
  • Who created the Julian calendar?
  • Russian history